Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA
Melissa Spiccia | MELISSA SPICCIA

Lethe 2018 (1 of 15)

Space, like time, engenders forgetfulness; but it does so by setting us bodily free from our surroundings and giving us back our primitive, unattached state.. Time, we say, is Lethe; but change of air is a similar draught, and, if it works less thoroughly, does so more quickly.
Thomas Mann, The Magic Mountain.

I came across this quote by Thomas Mann after a period of thought around the notion of time. These images are a product of my ongoing curiosity about time and its connection between the body and photography.

Our bodies are physical sites of exchange between our inner and outer worlds with porous gateways, absorbing, consuming and leaking. We are unstable bodies. Our minds can hold onto things whilst other things slip through. Memories seem to exist for themselves. In the mind, skin, creases and crevasses.

We may be bound by gravity but our bodies are constantly having to reconstitute themselves with time as it transforms into another state. The skin almost at odds with time. Erasing the marks on its surface, reversing, running time backwards.

How our bodies hold time then led me to the work of Philosopher Brad Skow. Skow has a theory on the past, present and future, whereby he believes the three coexist. “We are not located at a single time. Time does not pass”. Instead his theory suggests, we exist in a “temporally scattered” condition. “Spread out in time, something like the way you’re spread out in space”.

Perhaps then we are scattered. In time, in our bodies, in the corners of our minds.

Subjectively, photography I believe can capture this scattered state. Validating something that becomes almost tangible. Observing in the image time spread out in all directions. Altering our relationship with time and our memory of it. By gathering time, photography can centre for a moment the dance of the past, present and with what is to unfold with some kind of resolve.

1 of 15 images